Summer Session One: May 20 - June 28

Courses offered

ART 204: Digital Photography Workshop (3 credits)
BSAD 309/INTD 309: Finance and the Brain (4 credits)
ECON 264/INTD 264: Bees and Economics (4 credits)
EDUC 290: African American Children's Literature (3 credits)
HIST/INTD 390: Mapping Foodscapes, Environments, and History (3 credits)
INTD 130: Cancer Biology (4 credits)
INTD 265: Nanotechnology and Society (4 credits)
INTD 290: American Media and Sexuality (3 credits)
INTD 299: Internships (1-3 credits)
INTD 390: The Beatles: Transatlantic Culture, Society, and Politics (3 credits)
KNS 290/INTD 290: Medical Terminology (3 credits)
PHIL 390: Africana Philosophy (3 credits)
PLSC 140: Comparative Politics (3 credits)

ART 204:  Digital Photography Workshop (3 credits)

Instructor: Professor Danny Jauregui
Asynchronous
Satisfies COM3 Lib Ed requirement

This course will acquaint students with the fundamentals of digital photography including traditional and experimental uses of image editing software.  Emphasis will be placed on visual communication of ideas through the medium of digital photography. Instruction will cover topics such as digital camera operations, basic image correction, digital image manipulation, and will also cover fundamentals of composition and 2-D image organization. The assignments will include consideration of the cultural/political impact of digital manipulation, the relationship between subject and photographer, and the historical implications of photographic objectification.  Students should have access to a digital camera, tablet, or camera phone to complete course assignments. No prerequisite, however previous enrollment in Art 100, 101, or 210 is recommended. 

BSAD 309/INTD 309: Finance and the Brain (4 credits)

Instructor: Professor Fatos Radoniqi
Asynchronous and Synchronous
Satisfies CON 2 Lib Ed requirement 

This course explores how individuals make financial decisions. We study how to minimize financial decision-making errors by examining various psychological biases that we are susceptible to. Biases and simplifying "rules of thumb" are ever present in our real‐life decisions, whether we're choosing which car to buy or deciding whether to gamble. We also learn about financial decision-making through the lens of neuroscience, examining the role of emotion, the reward system, and reinforcement learning. The course focuses on personal finance and is intended to guide students towards better spending, saving, and investing decisions. We aim to answer two questions: What are the deep “irrational” forces driving financial behavior, and what can be done to better manage them.

ECON 264/INTD 264: Bees and Economics (4 credits)

Instructor: Professor Brian Gross
Asynchronous and Synchronous
Satisfies CON 2 Lib Ed requirement
 

Bees play a very important role in the health of our natural ecosystems, in the production of pollinator-dependent crops, and, of course, in the provision of honey and beeswax. This includes honeybees – what beekeepers keep in hive boxes and harvest honey from – as well as the thousands of species of “wild bees” that live natively in the environment. In this course we will investigate the challenges facing bees of both type, and explore the biology of bees and their ecological contributions, as well as the economics of bees as ecosystem service providers and/or micro-livestock. Through readings, documentaries and lecture notes and videos, students will learn about beekeeping, about the honey bee industry and crop pollination, and about economics as a discipline and method of analysis.

EDUC 290: African American Children's Literature (3 credits)

Instructor: Professor Amina Humphrey 
Asynchronous and Synchronous
Satisfies CUL 4 Lib Ed requirement

This is a class about the history and culture of African Americans from West Africa to the United States as represented in children’s literature.  We will discuss both writers and illustrators of children's texts with an emphasis on how both the writers and illustrators depict authenticity and representation.  Furthermore, we will cover the following topics:  West Africa, The Middle Passage, Slavery, Abolitionism, Jim Crow, The Great Migration, Integration, Lynching, Sharecropping, Poverty, Language, Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, Gay Rights Art, Music, Food, Black Popular Culture, and the Body.  

HIST/INTD 390: Mapping Foodscapes, Environments, and History (3 credits)

Instructor: Professor Natale Zappia
Asynchronous
Satisfies the CON2 Lib Ed requirement

This course will explore the role of food in shaping our urban environments and histories. It will particularly focus on Los Angeles and utilize various digital mapping platforms, including GIS story mapping, Palladio, the Open Gaarden app, and Google Earth. 

INTD 130: Cancer Biology (4 credits)

Instructor: Professor Sylvia Vetrone
Asynchronous and Synchronous
Satisfies the CON2 Lib Ed requirement
 

This course will increase your basic scientific understanding of the biology of cancer, and understanding of the societal and cultural perspectives of cancer within the United States. This understanding will also include an introduction into the cellular biology, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention of various types of cancers.  In addition, you will be introduced to the history of cancer in American society, the politics that surround cancer research and advocacy, and exploring if we can win the fight against cancer.  By the end of the course you should have a new appreciation of how social and cultural perspectives shape, influence, and drive the advancements of current and future cancer research. 

INTD 265: Nanotechnology and Society (4 credits)

Instructor: Professor Serkan Zorba
Asynchronous
Satisfies the CON 2 Lib Ed requirement

Nanotechnology is by its nature an interdisciplinary subject. It is where different fields of science and technology converge: physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. This course will lay down the technical background of nanotechnology, and discuss its potential implications for society. This exciting field is projected to bring about profound changes in our lives: ultra-fast computers, disease-fighting nano-robots (nanites), self-cleaning and color changing car/window surfaces, to name a few. The course will also emphasize how ethics and societal considerations have enormous transforming power over science and technology, and how this is a very healthy interaction for both. Throughout the course, we will draw on the ideas and writings of an eclectic group of scientists, philosophers, and futurists. 

INTD 290: American Media and Sexuality (3 credits)

Instructor: Professor Christina Scott
Asynchronous and synchronous
Satisfies the CUL 4 Lib Ed requirement

This course will focus on the influence that American media has on our sexual identity and culture. Students will explore how sexuality has been portrayed in North American media, including films, television shows, and print media over the past three decades, with a primary focus on contemporary media. Students will come to understand how cultural expectations of sexuality are generated, shaped, and reinforced by the media and the psychological effects associated with these social comparisons.  

INTD 299: Internships (1-3 credits available)

Instructor: Michelle Ponce
Asynchronous

INTD 299 is intended to support the core learning that takes place while a student participates in an academically-related internship. Course content and assignments will enable students to reflect on their day-to-day, hands-on experience, enhance existing skills, acquire new skills, apply content and theory learned in coursework (major, minor and liberal education), create professional contacts, strengthen their resumes, and learn from professionals in the field.

INTD 390: The Beatles: Transatlantic Culture, Society, and Politics (3 credits)

Instructor: Professor José Ortega
Asynchronous
Satisfies CUL 6 Lib Ed requirement 

This course will evaluate, analyze, and historicize The Beatles as artists, cultural symbols, and musical icons.  Their career spanned the turbulent 1960s, providing us with a unique opportunity to gauge the articulation between music, society, and politics during a critical decade in recent history. By examining the diverse origins of their music we will consider how transatlantic communities and cultures influenced the development of “Beatlemania” in an increasingly globalized world.  

KNS 290/INTD 290: Medical Terminology (3 credits)

Instructor: Melanie Householder
Asynchronous

It is not uncommon to hear someone describe medical terminology as “a whole other language.” And for most of us, it really is. Learning to decode, understand, and use this language is a process that requires study, time, and practice. We know that learning the language of any discipline is a critical component to success in the field. Thus, this course will provide students with an organized and methodical platform to develop confidence and competence with the use of medical terminology. Topics to be covered include the following: word parts, word building, pronunciation, bacteria, colors, major anatomical terms, plural endings, abbreviations, medical and health professions, diagnostic and laboratory abbreviations and acronyms, all major body systems, and cancer medicine.

PHIL 390: Africana Philosophy (3 credits)

Instructor: Professor Michelle Switzer
Asynchronous
Satisfies CUL 1 Lib Ed requirement

Africana Philosophy covers the philosophies of African peoples and persons of African descent who are indigenous to continental Africa and the many African Diasporas worldwide. This course considers forms of reasons marked by colonialism and racism, and diasporic consciousness from the Global South concerning liberation, the meaning of being human, and human relationships beyond colonial paradigms. After a comprehensive introduction to Africana Philosophy, we study the philosophical literature which analyzes an important historical figure and philosopher, Franz Fanon. 

PLSC 140: Comparative Politics (3 credits)

Instructor: Professor Deborah Norden
Asynchronous and synchronous
Satisfies CUL 6 Lib Ed requirement

This course compares different political systems from across the world and across time.  We look at how different democracies are organized, and how that impacts both representation and stability.  The course will also explore fascism, populism, revolution, and authoritarian governments.  Major themes in the class include alternative forms of legitimate authority, how political systems change, and the tension between sometimes stagnating stability and the unpredictability of strong leaders.